PTSD Blog

Alexander Neumeister Sentenced to Play Piano.

Diane
So I suppose I should post about this. This page has been around a long time – and I shared my experiences in my participation in three PTSD clinical studies. It’s pretty much how this page began. I documented it here and on my Facebook page. A play-by-play, day-by-day of my participation in the trials. And how the trials were investigated by the FDA, the data tossed, principal investigator let go… Well, he embezzled money from trials, too. Lots of it. And was arrested for it. Not just from NYU, but from Yale. And his punishment? Well read for yourself.

10 days.

Diane
10 days. 10 days until I’m admitted into the hospital for neurosurgery and a bit of a lengthy stay. I have seizures that are unable to be controlled by medications, so soon I will be having a surgical procedure that will remove the part of my brain that causes them – but first, they have to locate where exactly that is. So on November 6th I will have electrode grids implanted onto the surface of my brain, be taken off of all of my anti-seizure medication, and be monitored for up to 30 days in the hospital in an attempt

Five Little Ways I Deal with Depression

Diane
Reach out I do my best not to isolate. I come out of my room. I come out of my hiding place. Every day I reach out somehow – via social media, text, through an online forum, in some form I connect with someone. It’s not to talk about depression, it’s simply with the purpose of connecting to another human being, even if that person is a stranger. It reminds me that I am not alone.  Play music – the uplifting, happy kind Have songs that you associate with good memories? Music that makes you want to dance? Let it

Handling PTSD Anxiety Effectively After Being Triggered

Diane
There are times with PTSD that I still get triggered and get stuck with this nervous energy, a miserable level of anxiety that I simply cannot shake. Now I’m not talking about some of the other anxieties that are out there – social anxiety, generalized anxiety. Those are beasts all unto their own. I’m talking about PTSD anxiety. This is the kind of anxiety that you feel when your fight or flight response is triggered by some form of stimuli. Since there is no actual danger, you’re stuck with nothing to do with all this nervous energy. Years of living

Top Nine Things I’ve Learned During PTSD Recovery

Diane
You are not alone I’ve learned that as much as I wanted to isolate myself, connecting with others heals. I’m not going to quote the depressing statistics here, but child abuse is rampant across the globe, as is domestic abuse and rape. The link from trauma to survivor is very personal, but just remember whatever your situation – you are not alone. #metooI isolated myself for a very long time. It didn’t help me – it hurt. Isolating yourself slows down, if not stops, the healing process. There are numerous online PTSD forums which I’ll link to at the bottom

Will this never end? Seizures again.

Diane
After a couple weeks of those panic-like auras, I had another grand mal seizure at around 4:30 this morning. Only the second one in my life. Chewed up my tongue pretty good, wet the bed, and have a headache. I feel just exhausted. My husband took good care of me and rolled me over…unfortunately I bit his finger a little. 🙁 I just don’t know what to do. I didn’t expect to be put into this situation. Onward.

Overcoming the Burden of Guilt

Diane
When something terrible happens to you that causes you to be constantly fearful or ashamed, a deep level of guilt can begin to take root. Guilt can keep you from seeking out and experiencing the joy you so desperately need to fully heal by making you feel as if you don’t deserve it. Everyone feels guilt once in a while, but if you’re a trauma survivor, it becomes a part of you. Suddenly all the mistakes you’ve ever made (or think you’ve made) start to overwhelm you. You can feel guilty for what you did. You can feel guilty for

Informational Links about PTSD

Diane
As a follow-up to the post I created yesterday regarding the effects of PTSD on the brain, I’d like to share some links with all of you. If you have research that you would like to share, please feel free to post it in the comments section or send me the information via the send a message form! It is together with knowledge that we find the tools to heal. Elevated brain cannabinoid CB1 receptor availability in post-traumatic stress disorder: a positron emission tomography study PTSD Pharmacotherapy Could Target Cannabinoid Receptors, Study Suggests Marijuana-like compound could lead to first-ever medication

Why can’t you just get over it? There could be a biological reason.

Diane
This question, while highly offensive when asked in the usual manner, deserves an answer. Those of us who suffer from PTSD day after day and year after year – WE deserve answers.And now we are getting them. Do you feel jumpy all the time? Find it impossible to get to sleep? Have recurring nightmares? Are you angry or irritable for no apparent reason? There’s a reason for that, and it has nothing to do with character flaws. Below you’ll see brain scans of three different people: – one who experienced trauma and developed PTSD (PTSD) – one who experienced trauma

Allostatic Load and Stress-Related Disease

Diane
Allostatic load (AL) is a term used to describe the cumulative physiological wear and tear that results from repeated efforts to adapt to stressors over time. Unlike other psychobiological models of stress that focus on a single outcome variable (e.g., cortisol) or physiological system (e.g., the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal –HPA- axis), the AL model emphasizes multi-system dysregulation. By combining multiple biological risk factors into a composite score, risk for a variety of stress-exacerbated diseases can be assessed in healthy individuals prior to signs and symptoms of clinical disease. Also, use of a composite AL may allow for quantification of stress burden across

Easing Anxiety Through Mindful Breathing

Diane
I suffer from anxiety. And when I say suffer, I mean suffer. It sucks. I have constant baseline low-level anxiety. When I get spooked or ‘triggered’, I can go into full-on meltdown mode, which quickly progresses to ‘freeze mode’ or getting ‘locked up’. I have a few different methods of trying to steer the ship in another direction when it feels like the situation is escalating. The easiest and most reliable of these methods is something I refer to as mindful breathing; or simply, “my breathing” or “my exercises”. Here’s how it’s done: Close your eyes. Take a breath, and